Social Dental Network

Posts Tagged ‘crowns’

What is Anti-Aging Dentistry?

In Dental Care on September 27, 2011 at 4:30 AM

We all get old.

Despite the newest advances in technology, medicine, and even dentistry, that is an undeniable fact none of us can avoid.

But there are steps we can take to mitigate health problems and degenerative ailments, allowing us to not only age gracefully but also with a better understanding of how technological advancements in medicine can also improve our quality of life.

anti_aging_dentistry

Photo courtesy of Julien Tromeur

And we’re not talking about growth hormone therapy to retain the Rocky-esque physique, or sleeping in hyperbaric chambers like Michael Jackson.

While those methods of personal anti-aging wellness may certainly prove advantageous for some, most of us don’t have the resources or even the desire to explore such extremes.

However, most of us can certainly benefit from a little anti-aging dentistry.

According to transgenerational.org; today, one out of every 9 Americans is “old”—another former youth turns 50 every 8 seconds. Those age 65 and older now exceed 35 million, a number poised to explode. January 2011 ushered in the first of approximately 77 million Baby Boomers, born from 1946 through 1964 and are surging toward the gates of retirement.

Anti-aging dentistry is not a fad, phase, or sales pitch.

bit_collapse_anti_aging_dentistryTechnology and medicine combine to offer the growing elderly population a way to not only reduce the visual signs of aging, but more importantly the health-related oral systemic issues often associated with tooth and gum degeneration.

Yes, Botox injections and purely cosmetic dentistry applications certainly offer the elderly population an expanded array of dental options to combat the outwardly noticeable indications of time.

But, anti-aging dentistry also addresses the oral systemic health issues such as neuromuscular dentistry, and even the removal and rehabilitation of old porcelain veneers, fillings, or crowns.

A recent press release from a dentist in Santa Monica, California, outlines another area of concern among the growing population of elderly dental patients – ‘bite collapse.’

While Los Angeles is probably the epicenter of anti-aging dentistry as it relates to vanity and cosmetics, that doesn’t mean oral systemic health doesn’t receive top billing!

So, how can this building groundswell of dental health information move its way across the country and around the world?

Interpersonal communication.

How can you learn more about anti-aging dentistry?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missing a Tooth?…Press PRINT

In Dental Products on July 19, 2011 at 4:30 AM

We’ve heard of teeth whitening performed by sophisticated lasers, and we now know there are at least five dental-specific apps available on your mobile device du jour.

So what is it about prosthetic dentistry, and 3D printing that can possibly be considered news for the average dental patient?

You make the call…

According to this story on prosthetic dentistry, mechanical engineers in Iran report in the International Journal of Rapid Manufacturing that printing our own teeth may not be so far off into the future.

You read that correctly, printing our own teeth is something that is very possible in the near future given this enhanced take on CAD/CAM technology.

The computer scans our chompers, and with a couple of mechanical whirs and beeps, our new tooth spits out of the print tray.

OK, maybe the technology is a bit more involved than that.

You can read more on ScienceDaily.com, and read how rapid prototyping can be used to fabricate dental objects such as implants and crowns quickly and easily even where features such as overhangs, sharp corners and undercuts are required.

While ‘single-visit’ dentistry isn’t anything new in the United States, this technology certainly promises more examination into how we as dental patients can not only improve our overall dental health experience, but also limit our time spent in the dental chair.

Watch this COOL process take place, play this video on 3D Printing and see how this Massachusetts company can fabricate a crescent wrench from one of these printers:

A tooth can’t be that much different from a wrench, right?

 

 

 

What is the Oldest Disease Known to Humans?

In Dental Care on June 21, 2011 at 4:30 AM

Nope, it’s not the common cold. Nor is it arthritis, malaria, or leprosy.

According to Healthplex Dental trivia, tooth decay is not only the oldest disease we know of, but also the most common and widespread.

A quick internet search should reveal plenty of claims to the contrary, with even the Guinness Book of World Records getting in on the action.

Tooth decay, which is also called dental cavities or dental caries, is the destruction of the outer surface (enamel) of a tooth. Decay results from the action of bacteria that live in plaque, which is a sticky, whitish film formed by a protein in saliva (mucin) and sugary substances in the mouth. The plaque bacteria sticking to tooth enamel use the sugar and starch from food particles in the mouth to produce acid.1

How can we keep this cavity coalition at bay?

Brush our teeth, floss, keep our regular dental appointments…lather rinse repeat!

It has been estimated that 90% of people in the United States have at least one cavity, and that 75% of people had their first cavity by the age of five. Although anyone can have a problem with tooth decay, children and senior citizens are the two groups at highest risk. Other high-risk groups include people who eat a lot of starchy and sugary foods; people living in areas without a fluoridated water supply; and people who already have numerous dental restorations (fillings and crowns).2

Prevention is Key

With the cost of dentistry and health insurance limitations sometimes compounding the issue of proper treatment, we can all take a little preventative maintenance. According to the Medical Dictionary; It is easier and LESS expensive to prevent tooth decay than it is to treat it.

The four major prevention strategies include: proper oral hygiene; flouride; sealants; and attention to diet.

Proper oral hygiene equates keeping our dentist appointments, and brushing twice a day. Throw in some daily flossing and we’re ahead of the game!

Fluoride is a naturally occurring substance that slows the destruction of enamel and helps to repair minor tooth decay damage by remineralizing tooth structure. Toothpaste, mouthwash, fluoridated public drinking water, and vitamin supplements are all possible sources of fluoride.3

A sealant is a thin plastic coating that is painted over the grooves of chewing surfaces to prevent food and plaque from being trapped there. They cost less than fillings and can last up to 10 years, although they should be checked for wear at every dental visit.

As Americans, we can all probably use a little help on the diet. Big Macs and super sized sodas taste great, but maintaining a healthy and balanced diet will keep us having less fillings.

By knocking out foods high in sugar, we can deal a blow to the cavity creeps before they get entrenched in our mouths.

If it’s good for our teeth, it’s good for our overall physical health too.

If you have any questions about tooth decay, dental sealants, flouride treatment, or with help maintaining a proper diet…ask your dentist. Our teeth and gums act as early warning indicators of more serious physiological issues, don’t let the cavity creeps call in reinforcements!