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Posts Tagged ‘dental emergency’

Common Dental Emergencies During the Holiday Season

In Dental Care on December 14, 2010 at 4:00 AM

Here’s some dental emergency tips to take on the road with you this holiday season. We tend to overindulge a bit during this time of year, and sometimes our teeth suffer the consequences. If your cider was too hot, or if an errant snowball found your face, here’s some important info to keep in mind. It really could mean the difference between saving, or losing a tooth (or teeth). Here’s what the ADA recommends to quickly address a possible dental emergency:

Bitten Lip or Tongue

Clean the area gently with a cloth and apply cold compresses to reduce any swelling. If the bleeding doesn’t stop, go to a hospital emergency room immediately.

Broken Tooth

Rinse your mouth with warm water to clean the area. Use cold compresses on the area to keep any swelling down. Call your dentist immediately.

Cracked Tooth

Apply cold compresses to control swelling. Go to your dentist or a hospital emergency department immediately.

Knocked Out Tooth

Hold the tooth by the crown and rinse off the root of the tooth in water if it’s dirty. Do not scrub it or remove any attached tissue fragments. If possible, gently insert and hold the tooth in its socket. If that isn’t possible, put the tooth in a cup of milk and get to the dentist as quickly as possible. Remember to take the tooth with you!

Objects Caught Between Teeth

Try to gently remove the object with dental floss; avoid cutting the gums. Never use a sharp instrument to remove any object that is stuck between your teeth. If you can’t dislodge the object using dental floss, contact your dentist.

Toothache

Rinse your mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss or an interdental cleaner to ensure that there is no food or other debris caught between the teeth. Never put aspirin or any other painkiller against the gums near the aching tooth because it may burn the gum tissue. If the pain persists, contact your dentist.

Happy Thanksgiving!

In Dental Care on November 25, 2010 at 4:00 AM

We are thankful for the entire dental community, the unsung heroes that battle the cavity creeps on a daily basis!

Here’s some emergency info just in case all that good food results in a broken or lost tooth. Call the office immediately – and follow the directions on the voicemail for a doctor to contact in case of emergency!

If you can stand it, here’s some DIY instructions:

– If the tooth is loose (even extremely so!) but is still attached in any way, leave it in place. Do not remove it!

– If it is out of its socket completely and unattached, but still in the victim’s mouth, it is best to have the person hold the tooth in their mouth, if possible, until a dentist can attempt re-implantation.

– If the tooth is out of the mouth, do not let it dry out. Handle it as little as possible. Do not attempt to disinfect the tooth, or scrub it, or remove any tissue attached to it.

– If the tooth is recovered from the ground or other soiled area, rinse it off in lukewarm water. Preserve it in milk until a dentist is available. If milk is not available, lukewarm water will suffice.

Time out of the socket is critical in the long-term success of re-implantation. After 30 minutes, the success potential begins to decline. However, re-implantation is still possible after several hours, so the attempt can still be made even if the tooth has been out for a long period.

Remember, even if re-implantation fails, you have a variety of other options. For more information on emergency dental care or tooth replacement, you know what to do.

Source: Internet Dental Alliance, Inc.

Dental Emergencies

In Dental Care on October 11, 2010 at 3:00 AM

It can happen in the blink of an eye: an accident that leaves a tooth hanging by a thread or lying on the ground. Kids, athletes, soccer hooligans – it can happen to just about anyone. Ouch! But if it does happen, it’s important to know the proper first aid:

In our experience, most dental emergencies take place over the weekend. Here’s some tips to keep handy, we figured we’d re-post.

– If the tooth is loose (even extremely so!) but is still attached in any way, leave it in place. Do not remove it!

– If it is out of its socket completely and unattached, but still in the victim’s mouth, it is best to have the person hold the tooth in their mouth, if possible, until a dentist can attempt re-implantation.

– If the tooth is out of the mouth, do not let it dry out. Handle it as little as possible. Do not attempt to disinfect the tooth, or scrub it, or remove any tissue attached to it.

– If the tooth is recovered from the ground or other soiled area, rinse it off in lukewarm water. Preserve it in milk until a dentist is available. If milk is not available, lukewarm water will suffice.

Time out of the socket is critical in the long-term success of re-implantation. After 30 minutes, the success potential begins to decline. However, re-implantation is still possible after several hours, so the attempt can still be made even if the tooth has been out for a long period.

Remember, even if re-implantation fails, you have a variety of other options. For more information on emergency dental care or tooth replacement, please don’t hesitate to call us immediately, the doctor’s personal cell phone is on our voicemail, the system may even connect you directly depending on your telephone provider.