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Posts Tagged ‘flossing’

Top 5 Dental New Year’s Resolutions

In Dental Holiday Health, Dental Humor - Oxymoron? on January 6, 2012 at 7:19 AM

Who are we kidding; most resolutions are dying on the vine two weeks into the New Year push, right?

And it’s already January 6th, but that’s not going to stop us from publishing this sarcastic snippet of satirical social dental substance.

With the interest of breaking some resolutions and still promoting social-centric dental health info, here is a list of the Top 5 dental health resolutions we can (should) all feel free to break this year.
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  1. Brush 1x per Day
  2. Never Floss
  3. Drink Copious Amounts of Coffee & Smoke Cigarettes Like it’s the Roaring ‘20s
  4. Ditch the Dentist
  5. Keep Our Dentist to Ourselves

Can we not see the folly behind such proclamations?

What Gives?

Maybe we’ve lost it altogether, and the weight of the Holidays has led us to succumb to stupid suggestions.

No more feeling guilty for not keeping up with the exercise regimen, no more beating ourselves up for not taking care of that rotten tooth, no – not in 2012.

This year we can all take comfort in the fact that if we ignore our dental health; our overall physical health will suffer too.

But in no way will we brush our teeth twice a day; if we cut out just 2 minutes each day, that amounts to an additional 730 minutes we can devote to binge eating and continuing the sedentary lifestyle.

Forget about flossing, what is the attraction there?

Gum disease, red bleeding gums, bad breath, periodontitis, receding gums…all sounds peachy to us!

Bring on the coffee and smokes.

In fact, make it a triple-dipped all-foam all-fat double latte – Venti, por favore; and add the acrid accoutrement with a nice smooth Marlboro Red finish.

Mmmm…Welcome the flavor country! Top 5 Dental New Year's Resolutions

If that’s not something to wake up to every morning, who knows what is. And who cares what some doctor says!?!

Speaking of which, why visit the dentist once a year, never mind twice a year?

Eventually, all 32 teeth – or what’s left of them by the time we get done with ‘em – will just rot right out of our heads.

Ipso facto, we no longer need to see the dentist…an estate planner perhaps, but certainly not any dentist!

So, if we resolve to; not even brush our teeth enough to keep away the cavity creeps, forget the floss, pound smokes and joe like it’s a job, stay away from our trusted neighborhood dentist, we certainly can’t be relied upon to share this same local dentist with friends and family.

They can fend for themselves when it comes to ignoring their own dental health.

Let them suffer with everyone else out there that deals with dental anxiety, shoddy toothworkmanship, exorbitant health care related fees, and revolving door family dentistry.

We’d rather spend the money meant for our oral health on something more enduring, like a HDTV.

For all we care, our friends and families can go grab a ticket abroad for their dental care…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October is National Dental Hygiene Month

In Dental Care on October 11, 2011 at 4:30 AM

In addition to October being National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, dental practices across the land will be celebrating proper dental hygiene the entire month!

In honor of this dental-centric October occasion, we’d like to take this opportunity to showcase some seemingly obvious, but far too often overlooked, dental hygiene facts, courtesy of the American Academy of Dental Hygiene.

Brush 2 minutes, 2 times per day toothbrush_national_dental_hygiene_month

Brushing your teeth for two minutes at least twice a day remains a critical component to maintaining a healthy smile.

Studies have shown that brushing for two minutes is perhaps the single most important step an individual can take to reduce plaque build-up and the risk of plaque-associated diseases, such as cavities and gingivitis.

Floss Daily

Proper flossing or interdental cleaning removes plaque and food particles in places where a toothbrush cannot easily reach — under the gumline and between your teeth. Because plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay and gum disease, daily flossing is highly recommended. toothbrush_national_dental_hygiene_month

Flossing is an essential part of the tooth-cleaning process because it removes plaque from between teeth and at the gumline, where periodontal disease often begins.

Studies have revealed that only 16% of 961 periodontal patients followed over an eight-year period, complied with the recommended maintenance schedules.

Click the link to learn more about what to expect at your next Dental Hygiene Appointment.

Remember to floss daily, and brush for 2 mins per day – 2x day!

This simple oral health care regimen will not only lead to a happier encounter with our dental hygienists, and a healthier smile, we could also go a long way toward protecting ourselves against future maladies, such as heart disease, stroke, or diabetes.

Man Bites Dog!

In Dental Care on August 11, 2011 at 4:30 AM

With the economy in the tank and the stock market exhibiting more volatility than a Philadelphia sporting event, we bring you this financial examination of how we can actually save money by going to the dentist.

And according to this recent story from The Boston Herald, our canine friends can even benefit from regular dental cleanings and oral examinations.

For most of us, when it comes to dental insurance, the average coverage amounts provided are usually just enough to cover costs of our regular thrice yearly office visits. A typical exam, oral cancer screening, tartar or calculus scraping, followed by a visibly effective cleaning and polish, usually does the trick to keep our teeth happy and healthy until our next semi-annual dental experience.

That is IF we’ve kept up those regular visits, and IF we maintain the daily brushing and flossing regimen that some of us severely violate – at least on the flossing end.

Most of us can rest easy knowing our dental insurance pretty much covers all those normal costs associated with a typical 4 or 6 month check-up and exam rotation.

The key to saving money by properly maintaining optimal oral health comes down to two basic elements.

1.       Keep up with the regular dental appointments – whether you’re of the every 6 month group, or the heavy coffee indulging, dentally over-achieving every 4 month group.

Keep the appointments. Keep your teeth and gums healthy. Keep more hard-earned money in your pocket!

2.       Brush and floss between visits – does this one really need to be said, we’ve all been beaten over the head with this one…but some of us just remain dentally stubborn until we realize the folly of our ways.

And that folly usually costs us more in time and finances than if we simply did the right thing to begin with.

The underlying principle here that equally applies to dental health as it does to finances – at least in this blog post – is this;

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” – thanks Ben Franklin

Properly maintaining the daily brushing and flossing in combination with keeping the regular dental appointments will ultimately save us more money than not going to the dentist at all.

This holds true for dogs as it does for dentally irresponsible humans!

We can be stubborn, irresponsible, and forgetful; we as humans have the ability to reason.