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Posts Tagged ‘gum disease’

Top 5 Dental New Year’s Resolutions

In Dental Holiday Health, Dental Humor - Oxymoron? on January 6, 2012 at 7:19 AM

Who are we kidding; most resolutions are dying on the vine two weeks into the New Year push, right?

And it’s already January 6th, but that’s not going to stop us from publishing this sarcastic snippet of satirical social dental substance.

With the interest of breaking some resolutions and still promoting social-centric dental health info, here is a list of the Top 5 dental health resolutions we can (should) all feel free to break this year.
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  1. Brush 1x per Day
  2. Never Floss
  3. Drink Copious Amounts of Coffee & Smoke Cigarettes Like it’s the Roaring ‘20s
  4. Ditch the Dentist
  5. Keep Our Dentist to Ourselves

Can we not see the folly behind such proclamations?

What Gives?

Maybe we’ve lost it altogether, and the weight of the Holidays has led us to succumb to stupid suggestions.

No more feeling guilty for not keeping up with the exercise regimen, no more beating ourselves up for not taking care of that rotten tooth, no – not in 2012.

This year we can all take comfort in the fact that if we ignore our dental health; our overall physical health will suffer too.

But in no way will we brush our teeth twice a day; if we cut out just 2 minutes each day, that amounts to an additional 730 minutes we can devote to binge eating and continuing the sedentary lifestyle.

Forget about flossing, what is the attraction there?

Gum disease, red bleeding gums, bad breath, periodontitis, receding gums…all sounds peachy to us!

Bring on the coffee and smokes.

In fact, make it a triple-dipped all-foam all-fat double latte – Venti, por favore; and add the acrid accoutrement with a nice smooth Marlboro Red finish.

Mmmm…Welcome the flavor country! Top 5 Dental New Year's Resolutions

If that’s not something to wake up to every morning, who knows what is. And who cares what some doctor says!?!

Speaking of which, why visit the dentist once a year, never mind twice a year?

Eventually, all 32 teeth – or what’s left of them by the time we get done with ‘em – will just rot right out of our heads.

Ipso facto, we no longer need to see the dentist…an estate planner perhaps, but certainly not any dentist!

So, if we resolve to; not even brush our teeth enough to keep away the cavity creeps, forget the floss, pound smokes and joe like it’s a job, stay away from our trusted neighborhood dentist, we certainly can’t be relied upon to share this same local dentist with friends and family.

They can fend for themselves when it comes to ignoring their own dental health.

Let them suffer with everyone else out there that deals with dental anxiety, shoddy toothworkmanship, exorbitant health care related fees, and revolving door family dentistry.

We’d rather spend the money meant for our oral health on something more enduring, like a HDTV.

For all we care, our friends and families can go grab a ticket abroad for their dental care…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Are Your Gum Disease Numbers?

In Gum Disease on December 14, 2011 at 1:30 PM

Swift, silent, and deadly…

No, this isn’t another blow-by-blow breakdown of the Navy Seal invasion on Osama bin Laden’s Pakistan compound.

We’re talking about the cavity creeps and their incessant advancement toward total tooth and gum domination.

Gum disease has already been linked to plenty of other physical ailments, like heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and even premature birth; but there is a simple way to fend off gum disease or periodontitis – FLOSS!
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The next time your dentist (or hygienist) gives up the dental intel, take the time to mentally catalogue your gum disease numbers…2…3…4…3…3…2… if we hear anything over 2 or 3 we need to remain diligent, if we hear 4s we need to reinforce our oral defenses!

Here are some signs of gum disease courtesy of Colgate.com:

  • Red, swollen and/or tender gums
  • Bleeding gums when brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Changes in your bite, or the way your teeth fit together
  • Persistent bad breath

For some humorous take on the numbers of healthcare in America, and the role social media plays in the way Americans take in (and hopefully SHARE) this important information, check out this video from the Mayo Clinic:


 
And CARE enough to SHARE this info with your social circles!

 

Can Cutting the Fat Help Us Fight Gum Disease?

In Gum Disease, Oral Systemic on November 17, 2011 at 4:30 AM

In our never-ending quest to singularly promote socially-centric neighborhood dentistry, combined with our shared battle in shrinking our collective expanding waistlines, we hope to bring some attention to this latest round of dental health information purged on the public.

You may only think dentists can be interested in this type of stuff, and you’re right.

Who really cares how quickly science advances, what enzymes help us understand this or that, how the quality of health care improves, or how we can save money?
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Even if we do care about all those things, who has the time to have an actual conversation about it – or even just forward a link, right?

With the next viral puppy video burning a hole in our inbox, and a flurry of text messages to return, it’s no wonder optimal oral health really takes a backseat in our everyday lives.

If weight loss can be considered a popular topic of conversation these days, we can now add gum disease to the list of benefits involved with a reduction in body mass and associated waistline circumference.

Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researchers found the human body is better at fighting gum disease when fat cells, which trigger inflammation, disappear.

Now this doesn’t mean if we go out and dive into the next fad diet, that we no longer need to see the dentist as often.

This is only preliminary research and a mountain more needs to be done but at the very least it is another sign of the oral systemic connection.

A new paradigm between dentistry and medicine is now developing regarding patient care. As the oral systemic connection is more clearly understood, dentists who are trained in diagnosing oral and periodontal disease will play a greater role in the overall health of their patients.

Many times, the first signs of unnatural systemic health conditions reveal themselves in changes within the oral cavity.
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The health of our teeth and gums directly correlates to our overall physical health, and vice-versa.

At least that’s how we read all that dental clinicalspeak.

What this means to us, as dental patients is this; the better our dentists understand the connection between oral health and physical health, the better they can communicate this information to the rest of us – but we do have to go see them on the regular…and make sure we befriend them on Facebook, follow them on Twitter, and bookmark their blog posts!

A down economy should never be a reason to forgo optimal oral health; it will actually cost us more money to delay even just regular dental cleanings and exams.

This neglect leads to the development of oral health, tooth, and gum problems which then require more attention (read: time and money) from our trusted dentists, when the spit finally does hit the sink.

We don’t need to wait for the government to debate our health care, or break the bank on regular dental care.

There other easy to pay dentistry options, and alternatives to dental insurance.

And don’t be afraid to get your primary care physician involved in the conversation.


 
Tell us you wouldn’t Like that doctor’s Facebook page AND share the link?